HighPoint InSights

HighPoint InSights

Keep The Change: Making Business Transformation Work - January 2017

insights_header_logo


Overview

Implementing change is risky business, and very difficult to do well. Academic research, surveys completed by major consulting firms, and personal observation all reveal that most implementation efforts fail to achieve the desired results.

The reasons why companies fail to successfully implement change are reasonably well documented. Near the top of the list are the challenges of changing mindsets, overcoming cultural resistance, project complexity, resource constraints, and a lack of commitment.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Alex Nesbitt and Kristina Tober

Finding Your Forever Transaction: Understanding the Membership Economy - June 2016

insights_header_logo


Overview

Almost two-thirds of Americans own a smartphone, and almost half of those people state it’s something “they couldn’t live without.”  According to Forbes, the number of “endpoints” where consumers interact continues to grow, with greater cooperation between traditional and emerging devices. Consumers are quickly morphing from an “I want it now” mentality to demanding more personalized experiences and superior customer service.

Stating the obvious, technology is changing the way we do business today. Companies have greater access to their customers and vice versa. The trick to success is knowing how to tap into that transformation.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Robbie Kellman Baxter as told to Kristina Tober

The Value of Gratitude in the Workplace - January 2016

insights_header_logo


Overview

Human beings are driven by the idea that with success comes happiness. The harder we work, the more successful we’ll be, which will ultimately make us happier. We subscribe to this in business too, believing that with hard work comes reward – whether in title, promotion, profitability or financial incentives. If only we could achieve that raise, that promotion, or get that award or new
job, we would be happier.

Turns out we have the equation backwards. The truth is a happy, positive brain delivers higher energy levels, intelligence, creativity and more. Longterm happiness is not determined by external factors like money or success. The dynamic works in the other direction: our levels of positivity are largely responsible for how successful we are.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Karen Barth, Bob Kaplan and Kristina Tober

Reimagining Outsourcing - September 2015

insights_header_logo


Overview

Outsourcing is like a marriage. At the beginning, the relationship promises so much potential. But without good communication and mutual respect, it often struggles and can even fail. In the early 1990s, outsourcing was going to keep America competitive. But the honeymoon quickly ended. Outsourced labor costs, once thought to be a 15 to 20 percent advantage in emerging markets, started to rise, often at rates higher than in the U.S. Distance and cultural barriers inhibited process improvements, and the quality of customer interactions and service failed to live up to established standards. No surprise, problems resulted from the actions of both partners in the relationship. Too many outsourcers created an environment where employees were viewed as expendable and lacked any incentive to improve processes or raise productivity. Often the way the work was designed discouraged creativity, and high turnover prevented outsourcers from meeting, let alone exceeding, operational targets as workers weren’t on the job long enough to develop meaningful knowledge and expertise.

Read More

By: Bob Kaplan and Kristina Tober

Tackling Today's Challenges to New Market Entry - June 2015

 

insights_header_logo


Overview

Growing your business used to be simple. Gather data, analyze it, select a market and develop your strategy, then reap the returns. To say now it’s not that straightforward is stating the obvious.

The tactics to entering a new market need to evolve, asserts Luiz Zorzella, consultant to HighPoint Associates, seasoned expert on new markets and growth, and author of Revenue Growth: Four Proven Strategies. He proposes a fresh approach to new market entry that is more agile and dynamic in nature, and encourages flexibility, adaptability and speed. Instead of relying on broad strategy development, his process uses “experiments” as a means to test hypotheses about a new market, gain insight and make adjustments along the way.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Kristina Tober and Luiz Zorzella

Is Big Data the Answer? - April 2015

insights_header_logo


Overview

Big data. It’s THE game changer your company has been looking for. It can drive dramatic cost reductions and productivity improvements, help you discover the next best product and transform your marketing strategy.

After all, big data helped UPS review routes and save $30 million every time it reduced one daily mile driven per driver. Companies are even using big data to run behavioral tests and provide insight on the best person to hire for a job.

So why aren’t you using it?

“Don’t panic,” says HighPoint Senior Advisor Robert Kaplan, who has over 30 years of consulting and senior executive experience in IT strategy and operations. “All the hype suggests that big data is the panacea for business today. But the reality is not so clear. Yes, there are amazing opportunities to be realized when you use big data and data analytics effectively. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of challenges and issues needing to be addressed.”

In fact, 55 percent of big data projects don’t get completed, and many others fall short of their objectives. And while the worldwide market for analytics remains top of mind for CIOs through 2017, more than half of projects will fail because they aren’t completed on time or on budget, or don’t deliver what was hoped.

So what’s standing in the way?

Read More

By: Kristina Tober and Bob Kaplan, with contributions from Alon Bochman and Iván Markman

Strategy from a Vision, Values and Talent Perspective - February 2015

insights_header_logo


Overview

Every good strategic leader works hard to design a business strategy that creatively serves the needs of customers in the face of tough competitors and delivers enterprise value. Business school core courses have been shaped and consulting firms created to help executives responsible for strategy analyze and synthesize their way to this straightforward goal.

But there is a quite different approach to strategy that many companies and businesses might be wise to think about. By focusing on vision, values and talent, companies can engender much more substantive thinking and discussion about where they want to go and what it will take to get there.

“Transformative business leaders – those who truly build enduring franchises that are devilishly hard to compete against – think about strategy very differently than do those who take a more custodial approach,” asserts Tom Woodard, Senior Advisor to HighPoint Associates. Woodard has over 35 years of experience working with corporate management teams on strategy and organizational design.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Kristina Tober and Tom Woodard

Agile Strategy - November 2014

insights_header_logo


Overview

Mention strategy development and most CEOs grit their teeth, imagining months of analysis led by corps of consultants, often with significant cost and a result that doesn’t match where the company and its senior team really sees itself going.

Sadly, many CEOs don’t have a lot of confidence in their strategy. According to a 2013 Booz & Company survey of more than 3,500 global leaders, over half doubt their company’s strategy will lead to success or think their strategy is understood by employees and customers. Even more alarming, only a third feel that their company’s core capabilities fully support their strategy.

So much has been written about successful strategy development. And while the content of a good strategy is actually quite fundamental, the processes used to develop that strategy count in the thousands. What should be straightforward has been complicated to the point where most executives don’t believe in the outcome.

Previously, HighPoint Senior Advisor Jim Bennett shared with our readers a seven-step institutional strategy framework for any company needing to conduct a thorough and rigorous strategy review process. We believe it’s the goto “overhaul” process for any company lacking a clear view of its marketplace, its core businesses, competitive strengths, and differentiators. The result is a truly workable strategy that defines what a company needs to do and why.

In this issue, with HighPoint Consultant Mary Kate Scott, we review an alternate approach, “Agile Strategy.” Scott is a seasoned senior strategist with over 18 years experience helping clients capture growth opportunities in evolving environments.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Mary Kate Scott and Kristina Tober

How Technology Is Driving Role Changes in the C-Suite - September 2014

insights_header_logo


Overview

A wave of changing technologies continues to bombard companies at an accelerating rate. Emerging and expanding technologies such as the cloud, big data, business analytics and intelligence, and HTML5, all will have enormous implications for how companies deploy, use and manage information.

How well companies surf the wave will have a significant impact on their future success. New models for how to manage information, technology, and the role of the CIO will be dramatically different 10 years from now. Now is the time to start moving away from the old models; failure to adapt will likely lead to operational and strategic problems.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Kristina Tober and Bob Kaplan

Can You Keep Overhead Cut? - June 2014

insights_header_logo


Overview

It’s a classic command from top management. Need to reduce overhead? Just cut 10 percent.

Like most top-down edicts, it never works. You think you made the cuts but you haven’t. It doesn’t last. The costs always come back. Why? Because you failed to make the underlying changes in work, output, activity or priorities. Without real productivity improvement, the costs quickly come back. Worse yet, this across-the-board approach to cost cutting inevitably eliminates costs that should have been kept; in essence, “Throwing the baby out with the bath water.”

How can a company successfully reduce costs and overhead, and keep it cut? Look no further than a process developed almost four decades ago: the AVA.

Read More

Contributing Author: Henry DeNero, Senior Client Advisor to HighPoint

Why Building Trust Should be a Corporate Priority - April 2014

insights_header_logo


Overview

It’s not enough to be the best at your business anymore. No matter how great your product or esteemed your expertise, to earn business today your customers want to feel that you are a “Trusted Advisor.”

In his more than 45 years of consulting and executive management, Jim Bennett, a Senior Advisor to HighPoint Associates, has seen a significant shift in client and customer mindsets. “Clients want to know that you and your company’s interests are deeply aligned with theirs and that you are highly motivated by their success. They want to know they can count on you to listen to their issues and not just rush to offer a solution.”

Regardless of your business or what you’re selling, trust has become a core, if not the most imperative, ingredient in business strategy. For example, private equity firms aren’t just offering capital. They’re promising a team of seasoned advisors who you can entrust to deliver the funds, relationships and counsel to take your company to the next level. Health care products and services companies like Henry Schein, Inc. promote themselves as “trusted advisors” with a “portfolio of practice solutions” i rather than just suppliers of drugs, equipment and software. Automotive component manufacturers aren’t just selling a single widget, but promise customers a solution-oriented product to address a broader system need. No matter the industry, regardless of what’s being sold, clients want advisors they can trust.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Kristina Tober & Jim Bennett

When Should You Hire an Interim Executive? - February 2014

insights_header_logo


Overview

Getting good help represents a Board-level headache. Reading the financial press, it may seem that CXOs come and go with the frequency of jetliners at O’Hare International. While executive churn does not merit that comparison, C-suite turnover is commonplace, with a new wave of executive musical chairs ensuing after the 2008 recession.

Many reasons can lead to job vacancies. Someone gets a better position. Someone gets caught with his or her hands in the wrong places. Someone decides to found his or her own company. Someone was hired to do one job, but the company’s needs changed. Someone goes to sleep – or worse – on the job.

As a result, boards and private equity owners may find themselves scrambling to fill key management positions. The question they face is how to bridge the interim period most effectively.

  • Do you just leave the position open until you find a suitable outside
    candidate to fill it?
  • Do you name an insider as the interim executive or distribute responsibilities around the existing management team?
  • Do you elevate an insider to the CXO position in lieu of seeking an
    outside candidate?
  • Or do you get an Interim Executive (IE) to fill the gap?

In this article, InSights talks with Sumeet Goel, founder of HighPoint Associates (HPA), to explore the question of how best to use IEs to address short-term C-level needs. Goel has placed dozens of HPA senior professionals in interim positions. He sees such placements not as an alternative to executive search, but as a way to make such searches more effective.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Bennett E. McClellan & Sumeet Goel

How Can Brand Strategy Turn Your Brand into a Religion? - November 2013

insights_header_logo


Overview

The business world is cluttered with branding advice. Books abound on branding. You can read about brand building, brand bashing, brand gaps, brand invention, brand re-invention, brand management, brand positioning, brand rescue, brand secrets, brand sense, personal branding, and brand relevance. In fact, reading a book a day on branding would not get you through all of the brand-related titles listed on Amazon.com in a year.

Clearly, selling branding advice is big business. Wherever there is clutter, there is opportunity. World spending on advertising in 2012 was approximately $557B according to Nielsen’s Global Adview Pulse report. According to the well-known advertiser’s dilemma, executives know that about 50% of their advertising communicates messages that actually matter to target audiences. The rest is just wasted. So why invest in a brand at all, especially in tough economic times when Boards are more focused on costs and short-term returns?

InSights put this question to Ben Bidlack, HighPoint Associates’ senior advisor for branding. Ben has worked for the better part of two decades providing brand guidance to both B2B and B2C companies. He says the branding principles hold true in either world. Most recently, Bidlack was Chief Strategy Officer at FutureBrand in Southeast Asia. Prior to that, he was Executive Director of Strategy at Interbrand, the world’s largest brand consultancy. Ben received his MBA from Stanford University. Former employers include Accenture, Towers Perrin and Booz Allen Hamilton.

Ben Bidlack’s approach to investing in brand strategy is robustly simple. Effective brands engage their internal and external audiences, transforming them into ardent fans. If brand religion is the goal, Bidlack’s approach to brand building is anything but mystical. He starts with a hard, nakedly honest assessment of a company’s actual position in the world. He extends the assessment outward to the full set of competitive brands and offerings, and inward into the mindset and needs of prospects. The challenge is to develop the one, possibly two, emotionally compelling and overarching brand strategies that account for insights in all three areas: company capabilities/culture, competition and customers. And finally, he helps the company express that single brand idea, and deliver on that promise, through every pore of the organization.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Bennett E. McClellan & Benjamin Bidlack

How Can Turnaround Professionals Make Things Happen? - September 2013

insights_header_logo


Overview

Turnaround artists are both respected and feared in the management field. You often learn a company is in trouble when the turnaround artist arrives. Everybody in the company expects a shakeup. Send out the resumes, the sheriff just rode into town.

Neil Minihane chuckles at the image of the turnaround artist as somebody with a short temper and a bad attitude. A West Point graduate who still gets up early and wears a high-and-tight haircut, Minihane insists, “I’m a turnaround guy. Not a turnaround artist. Not a turnaround expert. Just a turnaround guy.” In other words, he’s a normal human being with a job
to do.

He explains, “The most important thing you need to affect a turnaround is leadership, and specifically communications skills. The reality is, I don’t do any of the heavy lifting. What I provide is a structured approach management can grasp, understand and buy into. The other thing you need is the analytical ability to translate facts into something people can
act on.”

Minihane started his turnaround career 15 years ago after leaving the Army as an Airborne Ranger. As a freelance restructurer he has mainly worked for Private Equity firms and privately-held companies. Minihane says, “I’m much more of an ‘aim before you fire’ person and would rather use a rifle than a shotgun. However, there is a time and place for each.” For Minihane, turnarounds involve more science than gut feeling. Turnarounds are about engineering, Minihane’s major at West Point,
not art.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Bennett E. McClellan & Neil Minihane

What Does Lean Manufacturing Really Mean? - June 2013

insights_header_logo


Overview

What does “Lean Manufacturing” mean? What does it take to implement Lean Manufacturing? And is “Lean Manufacturing” necessarily “mean manufacturing” as critics of this zero waste approach to making things have suggested? In this article, InSights talks with Joachim Fischer, a life-long practitioner of the art of Lean Manufacturing, to explore the answers to these questions.

Upon graduating with an Engineering degree from the University of Applied Science in Rosenheim, Germany, Fischer joined Gruber+Schlager furniture company where he first experienced how Lean Manufacturing comes to life. Mr. Schlager and his partner started their company in Austria shortly after WWII and he quickly realized that, like those who developed the much-envied Toyota Production System (TPS), “They just didn’t have anything to waste. Subsequently, they had to make the most out of whatever they had.”

As Operations Manager, Fischer also realized that Schlager’s concept of making the most out of every resource extended far beyond material inventories and machine capacities. While Schlager had only a modest education, he was shrewd enough to realize that the workers’ minds, their time, and their energy were of equal importance to the manufacturer as the materials and machines they handled. Making furniture under this inspired mentor taught Fischer, “Lean Manufacturing is something that is core to everything a business does. It is not just a program or the latest management fad. It is not just for the factory. It is a way of living.”

The rest of this article explores Fischer’s approach to applying the principles of Lean Manufacturing, implementing them, and checking to see that they are working properly.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Joachim Fischer & Bennett E. McClellan

Does Your Strategy Hold Up Under Pressure? - April 2013

insights_header_logo


Overview

The CEO develops strategy,
the Board approves it.
Well, not quite.
Not any more anyway.

Why? Corporate directors have long had the responsibility of seeking to assure the long-term viability of the companies they serve, specifically to maximize long-term value. While this standard has been in existence for decades, its application is shifting rapidly. Boards are increasingly seeking to understand not only what their companies are doing, but also why those things are being done. And they want to contribute their own ideas. In short, although management will always play the lead role in strategy formulation, it is increasingly a shared activity with the board. CEOs should embrace this trend, and take advantage of it by stress testing their strategies and involving their boards in the strategy-making process.

In this article, we suggest that greater board involvement in strategy-making is in fact a good thing. We further describe a process whereby CEOs and boards can establish a mutually productive strategy-making dialogue and identify the essential kinds of analyses that boards need to focus on to assure sound strategy formulation.

Read More

Contributing Author: Henry DeNero& Bennett E. McClellan

How Do Successful Retailers Deal with Economic Ups and Downs? - February 2013

insights_header_logo


Overview

Consumer-focused companies, such as retailers and consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies, experience good times and bad times. Yet some companies seem to consistently outperform their peers regardless of economic conditions. Recognizing this anomaly, HighPoint InSights posed the following question to HighPoint’s retailing expert Karen Schwichtenberg:

What do high-performing retailers do well, regardless of economic conditions?

Schwichtenberg responded by outlining three simple, yet profound principles:

  1. Recognize that no company controls the external environment. Winning retailers outperform their peers in spite of changes in the environment.
  2. Develop a crystal clear understanding of who their customers are. Regardless of the economic climate, successful retailers know the customers they serve and what those customers value.
  3. Enable leadership at all levels to act responsively as customers adapt to changes in their environment. The executive team sets the direction and the front-line staff converts this direction into sales.

In this article, Schwichtenberg elaborates on each of these themes. She asserts that the wisdom of high-performing retailers applies generally across most industries. If you have customers, these principles should apply to you.

Read More

Contributing Author: Karen Schwichtenberg & Bennett E. McClellan

How Can You Get More ROI from Your IT Investments? - November 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have gotten a bad reputation, as have CRM, HR and data warehouse projects. Most CFOs will tell you that large-scale IT projects always cost more than budgeted, seldom deliver on their promises, and often falter or fail before they go live. Further, the big companies that make enterprise software, such as SAP and Oracle, extract enormous profits for themselves and their consulting partners.

Bob Kaplan, Senior Advisor for HighPoint Associates comments, “When you look at academic studies, what you see is that for the past twenty years people have been writing papers on how the vast majority of big-scale IT projects either come in way over budget, under deliver, or just completely fall apart.”

Does Big IT really deserve its bad rap? On an empirical basis, Kaplan suggests that, “IT is guilty as charged.” Big IT leads to big messes.

Read More

Contributing Author: Bob Kaplan & Bennett E. McClellan

How Can You Make Strategic Sourcing Strategic? - September 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

Strategic sourcing is not just another term for “beat up your suppliers.” In fact, when fully and properly deployed, the goal of strategic sourcing is competitive advantage first, cost considerations second. Yet in many corporations, strategic sourcing simply equates to getting the best price at any cost. An unrelenting focus on numbers sidelines the pursuit of strategic advantage. This kind of misguided strategic sourcing preempts taking advantage of a true strategic approach.

In industries where knowledge is king, squeezing suppliers generally becomes counterproductive. Suppliers squeeze back, or they go elsewhere. Further, if your profits depend on the use of intellectual capital, then beating up your suppliers is a sure way to help the competition beat you.

One of the root problems seems to be that sourcing is not typically seen as a board level concern. Those applying strategic sourcing concepts generally have little to do with setting overall corporate strategy. Sourcing is a function to be performed, not a key factor for success. As a result, the practice of thinking strategically about sourcing is either ignored or deemphasized, and in either case disappears over time.

Read More

Contributing Author: John Domokos & Bennett McClellan

Does Strategy-Making Have to Be All That Complicated? - June 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

When corporate executives hear the term “strategy-making,” many of them reach for the aspirin. Strategy-making conjures images of massive data analysis efforts, indecipherable PowerPoint decks, and money spent on people who at the end of the day don’t typically get it right. And by the way, where are the results?

In this article, James E. Bennett shares his life-tested, client confirmed views on how to make better strategic decisions by organizing all strategic thinking under the umbrella of institutional strategy. Institutional strategy is not a specific set of tools or techniques. Rather, it’s a way of approaching strategy-making from the executive level. It is not so much a tool kit as it is a matter of perspective.

Jim has refined his approach to institutional strategy as an integrating concept during his 40 years of consulting and executive management. What makes Jim’s perspective unique is that he was present at the birthing of many of the strategic concepts that have become accepted wisdom. In other words, unlike many who pontificate in print about the nature of strategy, Jim was not a sideline observer of the struggle to define the discipline of strategy. Jim was a player. His views are from the perspective of one who helped shape the game that defined business strategy.

Read More

Contributing Author: Jim Bennett & Bennett McClellan

Can You Really Manage Enterprise Risk? - April 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

Disasters, both man-made and natural, have generated a lot of public attention in the past few years. According to data collected by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), natural disasters cost the world’s economy $35 billion in 2009 and $110 billion in 2010. Disaster losses more than tripled to $380 billion in 2011. You can’t predict them, but you can mitigate their effects.

And then there are the human-generated disasters – while we know that these economic disasters will occur, we cannot say when, where or from whom. Few predicted the financial crisis of 2008, yet it brought down entire companies inside and outside the financial sector, and nearly the entire US economy. And then there are the company-specific, self-inflicted wounds like Enron and WorldCom in the early 2000s, and the more recent examples of Toyota and BP. Could your company, or one of your major customers or critical suppliers, be next?

Some of these disasters could have been foreseen and some could not. What we can predict with certainty in our globally connected, technology-saturated world is that when disasters happen, they have wide effects. Even the self-inflicted kinds are going to happen, no matter how hard managers try to prevent them. Business is inherently risky.

In fact, managers can anticipate many of the major risks facing their companies – commonly referred to as Enterprise Risks – and to the extent that is reasonable, mitigate their likelihood or impact. This process is called “Enterprise Risk Management” (ERM) and should be as deeply ingrained in every company’s management as its strategic and annual planning disciplines. It is difficult but critically important.

Enterprise Risk Management is particularly daunting for managers of multinational enterprises (MNEs). The globalization imperative leads companies to seek competitive advantage by outsourcing and through alliances with highly specialized producers. As a result, auto factories spring up on flood plains in Thailand, global computer makers source controller chips from a single plant in Japan which happens to depend on Fukushima electricity, and many industries depend on countries with unstable socio-political conditions for large portions of their production.

Read More

Contributing Authors: Henry DeNero & Bennett McClellan

What Are the Key Steps to Assure Post-Merger Integration Success? - February 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) represent substantial opportunities for companies to consolidate, grow or diversify their strategic positions. M&A also represents a significant level of economic activity. While global M&A activity remains a trillion dollars below its peak level in 2007, M&A activity appears to be on the rise. U.S. based M&A transactions are expected to exceed $1 trillion in 2012.

As we noted in Part 1, the volume of M&A activity represents a large area of opportunity. We also noted that between 40% and 80% of M&A ventures fail to achieve their stated objectives. While it is easy to focus on the failures, it is also worthwhile to recognize successes.

The combination of Exxon-Mobile in 1999 represents perhaps the greatest M&A success in recent history. The three most powerful financial institutions in the U.S. resulted from mega-mergers. The mergers of Disney with Pixar, Sirius with XM, and R. J. Reynolds with Brown & Williamson also stand out as successful single-company combinations. Google appears to be headed toward setting a new record for most companies acquired. In the past decade, Google has assimilated more than 100 companies. Whether Google will succeed with Motorola remains to be seen.

Read More

Contributing Author: Alex Nesbitt & Bennett McClellan

Why Do Intentions Matter in Making Mergers Work? - February 2012

insights_header_logo


Overview

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) represent substantial opportunities for companies to consolidate, grow or diversify their strategic positions. M&A also represents a significant level of economic activity across the global economy. Market watchers estimate that 2011 global M&A activity increased to $2.75 trillion, up from 2010′s activity of $2.25 trillion. U.S. based transactions typically constitute about one third of global M&A value. Global M&A activity is expected to exceed $3 trillion in 2012. The U.S. will account for $1 trillion of that figure.

That’s a lot of opportunity. But a great deal of expected value from M&A never materializes. Various studies estimate that between 40% and 80% of all M&A ventures fall short of achieving their stated objectives. Few mergers fail so spectacularly as those of Time Warner-AOL, Daimler Benz-Chrysler, or HP-Compaq. Yet no industry sectors appear immune to M&A disappointments, whether such events materialize as quiet failures or public debacles.

For this article, Bennett McClellan asked HighPoint Associates’ Senior Advisor Alex Nesbitt, “What makes post-merger integration efforts work?” Nesbitt has assisted companies as an organizational change agent and post-merger integration specialist for the past 25 years.

Read More

Contributing Author: Alex Nesbitt & Bennett McClellan

Is Your Company Ready Beyond the IPO? - December 2011

insights_header_logo


Overview

While the IPO market has not recovered to pre-recession levels, the number of IPO filings over the past 24 months is more than double that of the previous 24, and the trend may continue. This looks to be good news for investment firms with stakes in recovering or growing enterprises. Or is it?

In this article, HighPoint Associates’ Senior Advisors Henry DeNero and Kevin Ventrudo talk with Bennett McClellan regarding tips and lookouts for executives and investors considering taking their companies public. Our experts caution that a company planning to go public needs to be ready on all fronts. The assessment of readiness begins with asking whether the company is organically ready and whether the management team is up to the task of running a public company. If yes, potential IPO candidates must then consider whether the appropriate governance structure is in place to keep the company on course for the decade ahead.

Read More

Contributing Author: Henry DeNero, Kevin Ventrudo & Bennett McClellan

Sumeet Goel Discusses HPA's Business Model with Jason Sanders - August 2011

insights_header_logo


Overview

HighPoint Associates utilized a unique approach to the delivery of high value management consulting services. The company manages a network of over 500 experienced, independent professionals from diverse industry and functional backgrounds providing best-of-class, customized advisory services for growth-oriented companies. Sumeet Goel, HPA’s founder and former McKinsey consultant, discussed his company’s history, future and current business model with Ivy Exec’s Executive Search Practice Leader, Jason Sanders.

Jason Sanders:Thanks very much for taking the time to speak with me today. Your firm, HighPoint Associates (HPA), uses a unique business model to deliver consulting services. Can you tell us a little about what makes HPA stand out from other firms?

Sumeet Goel:Our go-to-market model is unique. Traditionally, you would hire a consulting firm in only one way, by engagin a Partner who knows your industry. That Partner would send a standard configuration team of really smart, but most likely inexperienced generalists to work on your project.

The engagement is usually costly, and the billing relationship lasts indefinitely as the first project is usually followed by any number of successive projects, as the unwritten goal of the team is to remain entrenched in your operations, maintaining that revenue stream.

Read More

Contributing Author: Henry DeNero, Senior Client Advisor to HighPoint

[/vc_column][/vc_row]
[/vc_row]

Our company decided to take our business to Latin America. We needed to move quickly and yet needed to study and plan carefully and thoroughly. HighPoint Associates listened carefully to us and to our needs, and provided us with an ideal resource – a consultant who spoke both Spanish and Portuguese, with extensive market entry experience, a real understanding of the entrepreneurial mindset, and a keenly analytical mind. It was a perfect fit and the engagement was invaluable in helping us move forward with confidence.

-Co-Founder and Managing Director, Specialty property/asset management company

HighPoint Associates

(310) 616-0100

linkedin25